baby howl.

nevver:

Out and about with Julien Douvier

artandscholarship:

The origin of the blog’s icon (in the bottom left corner): Haeckel, Ernst - “Discomedusae. Scheibenquallen.”

"For Haeckel, the illustration is not a depiction of existing knowledge, but is itself the acquisition of knowledge of nature. The truths of nature are seen. Accordingly, Haeckel’s "Art Forms in Nature" is not merely a set of examples, which with each detail reveals part of the whole. It demonstrates naturalness itself. (…) Knowledge of nature is "natural aesthetics." Accordingly, aesthetics are nothing more than reflections of nature itself. Nature, which develops out of and into itself, is "beautiful." (…)
Consequently, the pages of “Art Forms in Nature” took on a further dimension for Haeckel. The fact that the illustrations are “aesthetic,” beautiful, and that this beauty is found in the smallest facets of nature—such as unicellular organisms or in the medusae of the deep sea—demonstrated to Haeckel that one finds in the smallest living things what distinguishes, or what at least should distinguish, humans in their judgements: “spirit.” The beauty of these minuscule creatures revealed to him the natural quality of one of the largest forms of life—human beings. Hacekel maintained that to be part of nature is to be an element in and the result of the evolutionary process. Accordingly, the phylogeny of forms is simultaneously the phylogeny of the spirit.”
- Breidbach, Olaf. “Brief Instructions to Viewing Haeckel’s Pictures.” From the 2008 reprinting and compiling of Haeckel’s “Art Forms in Nature,” originally published between 1899 and 1904.

artandscholarship:

The origin of the blog’s icon (in the bottom left corner): Haeckel, Ernst - “Discomedusae. Scheibenquallen.”

"For Haeckel, the illustration is not a depiction of existing knowledge, but is itself the acquisition of knowledge of nature. The truths of nature are seen. Accordingly, Haeckel’s "Art Forms in Nature" is not merely a set of examples, which with each detail reveals part of the whole. It demonstrates naturalness itself. (…) Knowledge of nature is "natural aesthetics." Accordingly, aesthetics are nothing more than reflections of nature itself. Nature, which develops out of and into itself, is "beautiful." (…)

Consequently, the pages of “Art Forms in Nature” took on a further dimension for Haeckel. The fact that the illustrations are “aesthetic,” beautiful, and that this beauty is found in the smallest facets of nature—such as unicellular organisms or in the medusae of the deep sea—demonstrated to Haeckel that one finds in the smallest living things what distinguishes, or what at least should distinguish, humans in their judgements: “spirit.” The beauty of these minuscule creatures revealed to him the natural quality of one of the largest forms of life—human beings. Hacekel maintained that to be part of nature is to be an element in and the result of the evolutionary process. Accordingly, the phylogeny of forms is simultaneously the phylogeny of the spirit.”

- Breidbach, Olaf. “Brief Instructions to Viewing Haeckel’s Pictures.” From the 2008 reprinting and compiling of Haeckel’s “Art Forms in Nature,” originally published between 1899 and 1904.


Francoise Dorleac, 1966

Francoise Dorleac, 1966

stonefoxie:

“Normality is a paved road: It’s comfortable to walk, but no flowers grow on it.”
— Vincent van Gogh

stonefoxie:

“Normality is a paved road: It’s comfortable to walk, but no flowers grow on it.”

— Vincent van Gogh

personalswear:

Belladonna of Sadness (1973)

“Someday you’ll find the right person, and you’ll learn to have a lot more confidence in yourself. That’s what I think. So don’t settle for anything less. In this world, there are things you can only do alone, and things you can only do with somebody else. It’s important to combine the two in just the right amount”

– Haruki Murakami  (via liamdryden)